Using Excel VBA For Loops: A Beginners Guide

Excel VBA for Loops is something that most people avoid like the plague, and there is good reason for this. Once you get past their scary name, they aren’t all that bad. In fact, they are probably one of the most useful things you can learn if you are interested in creating macros and automating Excel. Beyond their scary name, another reason why so many people avoid using loops in VBA is because it can seem tricky at first. The good news is that once you understand what a loop actually is and how it works, it isn’t as complex as you might think. Armed with this knowledge, let’s take a look at what exactly VBA for loops are, why you would use them and how to create them correctly in this blog post.

What are VBA for Loops?

A loop is a piece of code that is executed multiple times. Loops are a very common programming concept, and apply to pretty much every programming language. If you have done any programming before, then the idea of a loop might seem familiar to you. As you are probably aware VBA is the programming language that is used to create macros in Excel. Loops are used to run a certain piece of code a set number of times. When you use loops, you are telling Excel to run a certain piece of code a certain number of times. This can be extremely useful for automating tasks and saving time when you are working with Excel. For example, let’s say that you want to create 100 rows of sales data in Excel. You can manually create the data with a few clicks of the mouse, but that would be pretty time consuming. Instead, you can use a for loop to automate the process. Using a loop will save you a huge amount of time, and will make the task much quicker and easier to complete.

When to use VBA For Loops?

As we have just discussed, loops can be incredibly useful. They can save you time and help you to automate repetitive tasks. However, before we get too excited and start using loops in all of our macros, we need to make sure that they are appropriate to use. We can use a loop when we want to execute a certain piece of code a set number of times. There are two types of loop that you can use in VBA: - The For Loop - The While Loop The for loop is used to repeat a set of instructions a certain number of times. The while loop is used to repeat a set of instructions until a certain condition is met.

How to Create a For Loop in Excel VBA

You have probably worked out from the above that a for loop runs a set number of times. When we use loops, we use them to repeat a certain piece of code a certain number of times. For example, let’s say that you want to start a macro that will take data from a spreadsheet and place it into another spreadsheet. You want to take 100 rows worth of data, and move it over to another sheet. For this example, you can use a for loop, to tell Excel to repeat the process until 100 rows of data have been moved to the other spreadsheet.

Here is how the code will look: Sub MoveData() The above code is a basic example of how a for loop works in VBA. Let’s take a look at what each part of the code means: - The Sub Line: The first part of the code is the sub line. This is where you tell Excel that the code that follows will be used for a sub. In this example, the sub is called MoveData. - The MoveData() Line: The second line of the code is the beginning of the instruction. In this example, we are telling Excel to MoveData(). - The Range Line: The third line of the code is the range line.

This is where you specify which cells you want to repeat the loop on. In this example, we are telling Excel to repeat the process on “A100”. - The To Line: The fourth line of the code is the to line. This is where you tell Excel how many times you want the loop to repeat. In this example, we want the loop to repeat 100 times. - The End Sub Line: The last line of the code is the end sub line. This is where you tell Excel when the sub should end. In this example, we want the macro to end when the user presses a key on the keyboard. - The End Line: The last line of the code is the end line. This is where you tell Excel when the sub should end. In this example, we want the macro to end when the user presses a key on the keyboard.

The Forever Loop

The forever loop will keep repeating its code until a certain condition is met. For example, let’s say that you want to keep checking whether data has been entered into a cell until it has been entered. As you are probably aware, if you ask a user whether they have entered data into a cell and they haven’t, they won’t enter the data just because you asked them to. To solve this problem, we can use a forever loop to keep checking the data until it has been entered. Here is the code that you would use to create a Forever loop in Excel VBA: Sub KeepChecking() The above code is a basic example of how a forever loop works in VBA. Let’s take a look at what each part of the code means: - The Sub Line: The first part of the code is the sub line.

This is where you tell Excel that the code that follows will be used for a sub. In this example, the sub is called KeepChecking. - The KeepChecking() Line: The second line of the code is the beginning of the instruction. In this example, we are telling Excel to KeepChecking(). - The Range Line: The third line of the code is the range line. This is where you specify which cells you want to repeat the loop on.

In this example, we want to check “A10”. - The Until Line: The fourth line of the code is the until line. This is where you tell Excel what condition to check until the loop stops. In this example, we want the loop to continue until “A10” has data in it. - The End Sub Line: The last line of the code is the end sub line. This is where you tell Excel when the sub should end. In this example, we want the macro to end when the user presses a key on the keyboard. - The End Line: The last line of the code is the end line. This is where you tell Excel when the sub should end. In this example, we want the macro to end when the user presses a key on the keyboard.

The While Loop

The while loop will keep repeating its code until a certain condition is met. Let’s say you want to know how many rows are in a certain column in a spreadsheet. In order to do this, you would probably use the ‘COUNT’ function. While this works, there is a much easier way to do it. You can use a while loop to count how many rows are in the column. Here is the code that you would use to create a while loop in Excel VBA: Sub CountRows() The above code is a basic example of how a while loop works in VBA.

Let’s take a look at what each part of the code means: - The Sub Line: The first part of the code is the sub line. This is where you tell Excel that the code that follows will be used for a sub. In this example, the sub is called CountRows. - The CountRows() Line: The second line of the code is the beginning of the instruction. In this example, we are telling Excel to CountRows(). - The Range Line: The third line of the code is the range line. This is where you specify which cells you want to repeat the loop on.